Friday, September 12, 2014

September 22 Program: Preventing hospitalizations and improving health outcomes in high-risk patients


PLEASE JOIN US FOR LUNCH


Monday, September 22, 2014

11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


Miyama Main Hall, Harris United Methodist Church

Nuuanu Ave. and South Vineyard Blvd.

Ample parking - driveway off Nuuanu Ave.

 

Agenda:

11:30 Luncheon (optional): Various  pizza, Salad, Dessert—$5.00 donation

 

11:50 Welcome: Introductions and Remarks, Larry Geller, President

 

12:00 Program: “Preventing hospitalizations and improving     health outcomes in high-risk patients”, Dayna Minatodani, PhD, RN, Associate Program Director of Project H.O.P.E. (Home Outreach Program & e-Health).

Dayna Minatodani is a medical sociologist with subspecialties in aging and mental illness and am particularly interested in social inequality.

She is also a registered nurse with 20 years of clinical experience in a variety of health care settings in Honolulu, North Carolina and Virginia with the majority of those years devoted to caring for the older adult population with chronic illness.

Currently am Associate Program Director for the H.O.P.E. Program (Home Outreach and e-Health). H.O.P.E. is a home telehealth monitoring program with RN oversight and aims to prevent hospitalizations, improve healthcare outcomes and reduce healthcare spending in high-risk patient populations. 


12:30 Questions and Answers

1:00   Adjourn 


Wednesday, September 10, 2014

August 25 Meeting: Current Trends in Elder Abuse—Making Your Advocacy Count

Notes from August meeting: Current Trends in Elder Abuse

Scott Spallina

Scott Spallina, the Supervisor of the Elder Abuse Justice Unit at the Office of the Prosecuting Attorney in Honolulu named financial abuse of the elderly as the most common complaint. The elderly are easy targets because they are lonely and trusting.

Unfortunately, the perpetrator is usually a family member or a hired caretaker. They may cash checks made out to the elder by forging their signature, improper use of the power of attorney or using deceit to obtain assets.

This abuse often goes unreported because the victim doesn’t want to the family member to get in trouble, or the victim is too embarrassed.  Another scam targeting elders are letters claiming they have won a lottery.

These  letters are now well written and look legitimate.  Some include pre-printed checks that will initially fool even a bank teller. 

Other letters include a credit card that the victim is told the lottery winnings are on it and it just need to be activated.

In short, if you have been scammed do not feel embarrassed.  Report the crime.  All reports are confidential. Tel. 768-7536, or ElderAbuse@honolulu.gov

OTHER RESOURCES TO REPORT FINANCIAL/PHYSICAL FRAUD OR ABUSE

ADULT PROTECTIVE SERVICES, 832-5115, suspected adult abuse/neglect.

BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU, 536-6956, Monitors/provides info on businesses/contractors.
Consumer Protection, 586-2630, Investigates, businesses accused of being unfair.

CONSUMER RESOURCE CENTER, 1-800-394-1902, Info on businesses, licenses & resources for consumer complaints.

ELDER LAW PROGRAM, 956-6544, Free legal advice for seniors.

ELDERLY AFFAIRS DIVISION, 768-7705, City & County services for seniors.

LANDLORD/ TENANT HOTLINE, 586-2634, Information on Landlord/Tenant code.

SENIOR HELPLINE, 768-7700, Consultation , outreach and referrals.

Friday, August 15, 2014

August 25 Program: Current Trends in Elder Abuse—Making Your Advocacy Count


Find out how to make your own advocacy more effective



PLEASE JOIN US FOR LUNCH


Monday, August 25, 2014

11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


Miyama Main Hall, Harris United Methodist Church

Nuuanu Ave. and South Vineyard Blvd.

Ample parking - driveway off Nuuanu Ave.

 

Agenda:

11:30 Luncheon (optional): Various  pizza, Salad, Dessert—$5.00 donation

 

11:50 Welcome: Introductions and Remarks, Larry Geller, President

 

12:00 Program:  “Current Trends in Elder Abuse—Making Your Advocacy Count

Guest Speaker: Scott Spallina, Deputy Prosecuting Attorney, Elder Abuse Justice Unit, Department of the Prosecuting Attorney, City and County of Honolulu. We’ll get current background on elder abuse in Hawaii and move towards a discussion of how to combat abuse through better advocacy.

Scott Spallina is the Supervisor of the Elder Abuse Justice Unit at the Office of the Prosecuting Attorney in Honolulu. Scott established the Elder Abuse Justice Unit in 2008, at the direction of the then Prosecuting Attorney Peter Carlisle. The goal of the unit was and still is to “enhance awareness, prevention, and prosecution of crimes affecting the elderly” in Hawaii. The current Prosecuting Attorney, Keith Kaneshiro remains committed to fighting elder abuse and improving the quality of life for all seniors in the State of Hawaii. He has expanded the unit to three additional attorneys, two staff members and three law clerks. During his 19-year career with the Prosecutor's Office, Scott also headed the Domestic Violence Branch.

 

12:30 Questions and Answers

1:00   Adjourn 


Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Mental Health America Hawaii releases its Human Services Directory

by Larry Geller

The timing is painful: we’ve just lost Robin Williams to an apparent suicide. Could he have been helped?

This morning a mass email announced the publication of Mental Health America’s updated Finding Help Human Services Directory. It’s a list of phone numbers for a variety of services, not limited to mental health. For example, they also list senior services. It’s not posted on their web page yet, apparently, so get your copy from the link above. A valuable contribution.

MHA-Hawaii also accepts donations here.

I hope this could turn into a phone app one day, so that smartphone users could just press a button to find out where to find or get help. It would be relatively simple to do, given the tools available these days for writing simple apps.

Friday, July 18, 2014

July 28 Program: Measuring Social Change: Some Ideas and Discussion


Find out how to make your own advocacy more effective



PLEASE JOIN US FOR LUNCH


Monday, July 28, 2014

11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


Miyama Main Hall, Harris United Methodist Church

Nuuanu Ave. and South Vineyard Blvd.

Ample parking - driveway off Nuuanu Ave.

 

Agenda:

11:30 Luncheon (optional): Various Subway Sandwiches or pizza, Salad, Dessert—$5.00 donation

 

11:50 Welcome: Introductions and Remarks, Larry Geller, President

 

12:00 Program: Measuring Social Change: Some Ideas and Discussion”

Guest Speaker: Darlene Rodrigues, Community Grants Program Coordinator, Hawai‘i People's Fund


Organizations such as the Kokua Council are striving to make positive differences in the lives of seniors and others in Hawaii. How do we measure social change and improve the effectiveness of our advocacy? How do we know if we are making a difference?

 

12:30 Questions and Answers

1:00   Adjourn 


Thursday, June 19, 2014

Meeting canceled–Monday, June 23, 2014

Both the general meeting and Kokua Council’s board meeting are canceled for June.

See you in July.

Sunday, April 13, 2014

April 21 Program: Defending Hawaii's food supply by fighting farm labor trafficking


PLEASE JOIN US FOR LUNCH


Monday, April 21, 2014

11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


Miyama Main Hall, Harris United Methodist Church

Nuuanu Ave. and South Vineyard Blvd.

Ample parking - driveway off Nuuanu Ave.

 

Agenda:

11:30 Luncheon: Various Subway Sandwiches, Salad, Dessert—$5.00 Donation (optional)

 

11:50 Welcome: Introductions and Remarks, Larry Geller, President

 

12:00 Program: Defending Hawaii's food supply by fighting farm labor trafficking”

Guest Speakers: Malia Zimmerman and Clare Hanusz

Malia Zimmerman, Editor of the Hawaii Reporter, has won journalism awards for her public service reporting and for her investigation of human trafficking.

Attorney Clare Hanusz has represented many of the Thai farm workers trafficked to Hawaii. She is a founding member of the Hawaii Coalition for Immigration Reform and has spoken on immigration issues before many local groups and university classes.

Can Hawaii's food supply be considered safe if farm workers are compelled to apply pesticides in an unsafe manner?

 

12:30 Questions and Answers

1:00   Adjourn 


Monday, February 24, 2014

February 24, 2014 meeting: Congressional District 1 Candidate Forum

Here’s the video, taken by Doug Matsuoka. Click the thingy at the lower right for full screen, this image is rather small.

Candidate bios–Congressional District 1 forum 2/24/2014

Candidates were invited to submit a brief bio for introductions. Below are bios either as submitted or as found on the Web.


(Moderator) Jerry Burris

Jerry Burris has more than 40 years experience in Hawaii journalism first with UPI then with the Honolulu Advertiser. For years, he covered politics and the Legislature as the Advertiser's Capitol Bureau Chief. He finished his career as Editorial Page Editor and political columnist for the paper. He is co-author of two books, "The Dream Begins: How Hawaii Shaped Barak Obama" and "Sam King: A Memoir." He is currently finishing a book on a third legal/political figure which should be out in a few months. He is a graduate of the University of Hawaii.


Candidate bios as submitted or from Web sources

Ikaika Anderson

Ikaika Anderson has worked in government for the last 15 years, and has served two terms on the Honolulu City Council tackling Oahu's toughest issues.  He currently holds the position of Vice-Chairman of the Council and is regarded as a deliberate decision maker with a passion for ensuring that the community has a voice at the table.  His tenure has produced solid successes, including stabilizing Oahu's residential real property tax rate, improvements to the City's handling of its wastewater and solid waste, moving forward on Honolulu's mass transit system, and streamlining the permitting system for renewable energy.

Anderson is a 1996 graduate of Kamehameha Schools and 2002 graduate of the University of Hawaii Manoa with degrees in Journalism and Political Science.  He is married to the former Lisa Hirata and together they have four children - Tianni 12, J.W. 10 and twins Kaleb and Kaili, 4 years old.


Stanley Chang

Stanley Chang, the son of immigrants, is fortunate to have lived the “American Dream.” His mother and father, both  educators, taught him firsthand the value of hard work and determination – the defining characteristics of Stanley’s service in our community.
Stanley’s father came to Honolulu in the 1960s with little more than a commitment to further his education, start a family and give his children a better life than the one he had. He started as a beach boy in Waikiki and was soon able to pay his way through
college, buy a house and start a family. He knew that only in America could his dreams be realized through discipline and resolve. It’s how he supported his family and provided his children with world-class education.
As a graduate of Honolulu’s ‘Iolani School, Harvard University, and Harvard Law School, Stanley was fortunate to attend some of the nation’s leading schools. However, he will tell you the most important lessons he ever learned were those instilled within
him by his parents, friends and neighbors while growing up in Hawai‘i – lessons in responsibility, honesty, and humility.
In 2010, Stanley left his career as a real estate attorney in downtown Honolulu. He felt
a call to give back to the community that had given him so much. After knocking on
19,000 doors, Stanley was successful in his bid to represent his neighbors in the City
Council’s 4th District, which stretches from Ala Moana to Hawai‘i Kai.
Stanley got straight to work making city government more responsible and responsive. His proactive agenda and collaborative approach led to a series of significant accomplishments, which include:
• Spearheading a uniform policy for road repairs that
prioritizes proactive maintenance of roads instead of the old and inefficient “worst first” repair policy;
• Improving the daily quality of life for O‘ahu
families;
• Enhancing communication between the City and
constituents;
• Protecting our environment and keeping our
beaches and city parks clean;
• Supporting small businesses – the backbone of
Honolulu’s vibrant business community – and
spurring economic development;
• Streamlining basic services;
• Co-chairing the Counties of Hawai‘i Sister Cities
Summit at APEC; and
• Working to bring in new revenue streams for
greater city services without raising taxes on
Honolulu’s middle class.
• Fighting for record funding for road repaving;
Stanley Chang’s proven energy, passion, and ability to get the job done are why he will thrive in Congress.
Stanley is very proud of his work as Honolulu’s representative to the Hawai‘i State Association of Counties. This led to the opportunity to co-chair the Counties of Hawai‘i Sister Cities Summit in conjunction with the Asia Pacific Economic
Conference (APEC) – allowing Hawai‘i to leverage otherwise ceremonial relationships to reinforce its role as the economic center of the Pacific Region.
Stanley knows that no great accomplishment is achieved alone. That’s why he’s worked tirelessly to involve people in discussions on the important issues facing Honolulu. He’s built a solid reputation for listening to everyone at the table and
making sure that every citizen has a voice in their government.
Stanley grew up in Hawai‘i, built his life in Hawai‘i, and has dedicated his career to Hawai‘i. His fresh vision will serve us well in Congress as we work to overcome today’s challenges, while building an even better future for Hawai‘i.

 

Will Espero (from Legislature web page)

Senator Will Espero represents the 19th Senate District, which encompasses ‘Ewa Beach, Ocean Pointe, ‘Ewa by Gentry, Iroquois Pointe, and a portion of ‘Ewa Villages. He currently serves as the Chair of the Public Safety, Intergovernmental, and Military Affairs Committee, and as a member of the Committees on Transportation and International Affairs, and Ways and Means. He also serves as Majority Floor Leader.

Senator Espero was recently appointed to the Clean & Sober Homes and Halfway House Task Force, the Steering Committee of the Justice Reinvestment Initiative, the Government Contracting Task Force, and on the Board of Directors of the Friends of the Hawaii State Art Museum.

Senator Espero is a member of the Oahu Metropolitan Planning Organization, which coordinates federally funded transportation projects for Oahu. He is also a Board member of the West Oahu Economic Development Association, Workforce Development Council, the Interstate Commission for Adult Offender Supervision, Corrections Population Management Commission, Re-entry Collaborative Steering Committee, and Operation Homefront of Hawaii.

Born on November 6, 1960, Senator Espero was born at the U.S. Naval Base in Yokosuka, Japan. His mother is from Santiago, Ilocos Sur, and his father is from Bacnotan, La Union, in the Philippines. He graduated from Seattle University in Washington with a B.A. in Business Administration in 1982.


Joey Manahan (from Ballotpedia)

Joey Manahan was a former Democratic member of the Hawaii House of Representatives, representing District 29 from 2006 to 2012. He served as Vice Speaker of the House from 2011 to 2012.

He is a Honolulu City Councilman.[1] Manahan worked as an Election Specialist for the State of Hawaii Office of Elections, and legislative assistant to the Hawaii State House of Representatives and Hawaii State Senate.

He is a member of the Hawaii Filipino Junior Chamber of Commerce, National Federation of Filipino American Associations, and the Filipino Centennial Celebration Commission.[2]


Mark Takai (from Legislature web page)

Hawaii State Representative K. Mark Takai hails from the 33rd House District representing the communities of Aiea, on the shores of historic Pearl Harbor. He was first elected in 1994 and has successfully won re-election nine more times (1994 through 2012).

Mark is the Chairman of the House Committee on Veterans, Military, and International Affairs, and Culture and the Arts, and a member of Committee on Education and Committee on Higher Education. He served as Vice Speaker of the House during the 2005 and 2006 sessions. Mark served as Chairman of the House Committee on Higher Education (2003 to 2004 sessions) and as Vice Chairman (1995 to 2002 sessions). He served as Chairman of the House Committee on Culture and Arts for four years (1997 to 2000 sessions).

Mark was commissioned a First Lieutenant in the Hawaii Army National Guard (HIARNG) on July 19, 1999 and worked as the Preventive Medical Officer. Currently, he is a Lieutenant Colonel in the HIARNG and is the Division Chief for Soldiers Services and a School Liaison for the HIARNG. He served in Operation Iraqi Freedom as the Base Operations Officer (Camp Mayor) at Camp Patriot, Kuwait from February 2009 to September 2009. He served as the Company Commander of Charlie Company (Medical), 29th Brigade Support Battalion from November 2006 to May 2008. Mark was also called to active duty for six months (May to November 2005) and served as the Hawaii Army National Guard Deputy State Surgeon.

Mark has worked to develop successful partnerships between military-connected organizations and non-military entities with focus on the education of military children in Hawaii and throughout the world. From 2003-2009, he coordinated a six-year effort that netted an additional $40 million in Federal Impact Aid for the Hawaii Department of Education.

Mark currently serves as President of the National Guard Association-Hawaii Insurance Inc. and President (since 1997) of Waiau Community Association G-1. He was the President of the Hawaii National Guard Association (2012-2013) and the President of the University of Hawaii Letterwinners Club (2012-2013). Mark also serves as the coordinator (since 2004) of the Hawaii State Legislature's Military Appreciation Package and as a Board Member (since 2004) of Hawaii's Joint Venture Education Forum, a partnership between Hawaii's military component commands and the Hawaii Department of Education. He serves as the National Chairman (since 2006) of the National Network of Legislators in the Military, State Coordinator (since 2006) of the USA for Military Families, Chairman (since 2005) of the Pearl Harbor Historic Sites Task Force, and Coordinator (since 2006) for the Hawaii Medal of Honor, an award on behalf of the people of the State of Hawaii to an individual who was killed in action while serving our country as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom.

Mark received his diploma from Pearl City High School in 1985. He is four-time High School Swimming Champion and a High School All-American Swimmer. Mark received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science and his Master of Public Health degree from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. While at the University, Mark was a WAC Champion swimmer, the President of the Student Senate, and the Editor-in-Chief of the campus newspaper. After graduating, he worked at the State Department of Health as a public health educator.

Among his numerous awards and decorations, Mark received the Meritorious Service Medal from the United States Army in 2009, the Distinguished Service Medal from the National Guard Association of the United States in 2011, and the Hawaii Distinguished Service Order in 2012.

Mark and his wife Sami are parents of Matthew and Kaila. Both children attend public schools in Aiea. Sami and Mark are owners of Pacific First Enterprises, an insurance brokerage and consulting firm.


Katherine Xian

Kathryn Xian is a democratic candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives in House District 1, and an award-winning organizer and filmmaker. She is the Non-Executive Director of Girl Fest Hawaii and the executive director of the Pacific Alliance to Stop Slavery, Hawaii’s leading service provider for survivors of trafficking. Since 2005, Kathryn has helped pass 8 laws relating to human trafficking including Hawaii’s first labor trafficking law and the nation’s first state statute outlawing sex tourism as a felony offense. Kathryn is also a member of Chapter at the Cathedral of St. Andrew and the Chair of the Justice and Outreach Ministry.

Since 2000, she has been raising local awareness of the trafficking of women and children for sex to and from Honolulu and has influenced the passage of law with regard to sex tours and promoting prostitution.

In 2004, with the help of Equality Now, she led a publicity campaign incorporating a public rally and testimonials at the State legislature which resulted in the signing of Act 82, the first law in the nation to outlaw sex-tourism on the state level. Several states have modeled their laws on Hawaii’s Act 82 since then.

In 2008, she successfully demanded and saw pass the age defining a minor victim in Promoting Prostitution in the First Degree (in Hawaii) raise from “less than 16 years of age” to “less than 18 years of age” (Act 147).

She co-founded the Rape-Free Zone Coalition, which was responsible for enacting change at the University of Hawaii on August 29th 2005 to declare its system (10 Campuses) Rape-Free Zones and requiring all managerial and executive staff to attend an anti-sexism leadership training at Girl Fest led by Jackson Katz, former member of the U.S. Secretary of Defense’s Task Force on Domestic Violence in the Military and founder of MVP Strategies; an unprecedented event in the University’s history.

Xian was also awarded the 2005 Ellison Onizuka Human and Civil Rights Award by the National Education Association on July 2nd 2005 and is the recipient of the Soroptimists International of the America’s Women Making a Difference for Women Award 2006.

She was also one of five distinguished finalists in Glamour Magazine’s Women of Your Year Awards 2009 and was inducted to Pacific Business News’ 2010 Class of Forty Under 40.

In 2011, Xian successfully lobbied for the passage of Hawaii’s first labor-trafficking law and reforms to the Promoting Prostitution statutes. Previous to that, Hawaii had been 1 of 4 states in the nation with no local law defining the offenses as felonies and was ranked a Tier 3 state by the Polaris Project rating map, the worst rating for states. In 2012 Hawaii’s ranking improved to a Tier 1 state mainly due to Xian’s legislative advocacy for policy changes.

Also in 2012, Xian helped pass the state’s first Vacating Convictions law allowing victims of sex-trafficking to vacate their records of prostitution offenses if established that the prostitution occurred while held in servitude. In December of 2012, Xian received one of three Norma Hotalting Anti Trafficking Awards from Global Centurion, the Josephine Butler Award.

In 2013, Xian drafted and passed End Demand for Prostitution laws which make it a felony offense for any adult to solicit sex from children under the age of 18 and passed legislation to allow the Hawaii Department of Human Services to recognize children exploited for sex or labor as victims in need of services under the Child Abuse statutes.

She is a long-standing mentor to PASS’s trafficking clients.

 

Friday, February 14, 2014

February 24 Program: Hawaii Congressional District 1 Candidate Forum


Update: Candidate Joey Manahan has been added to the panel.

PLEASE JOIN US FOR LUNCH


Monday, February 24, 2014

11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


Miyama Main Hall, Harris United Methodist Church

Nuuanu Ave. and South Vineyard Blvd.

Ample parking - driveway off Nuuanu Ave.

 

Agenda:

11:30 Luncheon: Pizza, Salad, Dessert $5.00 Donation

 

 

11:50 Welcome: Introductions and Remarks, Larry Geller, President

 

12:00 Program:  Hawaii Congressional District 1 Candidate Forum

Moderator: Jerry Burris

Candidates: Ikaika Anderson, Stanley Chang, Will Espero, Mark Takai, Katherine Xian (Donna Kim will be out of town, other candidates may be added)

12:30 Questions and Answers

1:00   Adjourn 


Monday, January 20, 2014

January 27 Program: Gary Hooser: Kauai's Bill 2491 - A case study in community empowerment


PLEASE JOIN US FOR LUNCH


Monday, January 27, 2014

11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


Miyama Main Hall, Harris United Methodist Church

Nuuanu Ave. and South Vineyard Blvd.

Ample parking - driveway off Nuuanu Ave.

 

Agenda:

11:30 Luncheon: Various Subway Sandwiches, Salad, Dessert by Marilyn—$5.00 Donation

Election of Kokua Council officers

 

11:50 Welcome: Introductions and Remarks, Larry Geller, President

 

12:00 Program:  Gary Hooser: Kauai's Bill 2491 - A case study in community empowerment

Kauai Council member and former state legislator and director of the Office of Environmental Quality will describe how community action can overcome strong economic and political pressure.

Citizens of Kauai worked together to pass Bill 2491 over the mayor's veto. The bill requires the largest chemical companies in the world to disclose their pesticide use and prohibits the use of these chemicals near Kauai schools, hospitals and homes, imposing criminal penalties for violations. This new law may face challenges during the 2014 state legislative session.

 

12:30 Questions and Answers

 

1:00   Adjourn 


Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Senator Elizabeth Warren's floor speech on the retirement crisis, November 18, 2013 (video)

Congress is engaged in a battle to cut Social Security benefits, even though, for many senior citizens, Social Security is the prime, or only, source of income. It’s not clear that Democrats will stand firm against cuts—in fact, President Obama has, himself, put cuts on the table.

Here’s Senator Elizabeth Warren's floor speech on November 18, 2013.

Chained CPI has been proposed instead of cuts, but it is really just another way to cut benefits in fancier words. Social Security has nothing to do with the deficit, and Congress should keep its hands off money that people have themselves paid in. SS currently has a surplus, and simple adjustments to increase the income limit for contributions will assure its continuity indefinitely. Even without increases, it is in no immediate danger.

Monday, September 16, 2013

September 23 Program: City and State Work on Homelessness, Shelter and Housing issues


PLEASE JOIN US FOR LUNCH


Monday, September 23, 2013

11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


Miyama Main Hall, Harris United Methodist Church

Nuuanu Ave. and South Vineyard Blvd.

Ample parking - driveway off Nuuanu Ave.

 

Agenda:

11:30 Luncheon: Various Subway Sandwiches, Salad, Dessert by Marilyn—$5.00 Donation

 

11:50 Welcome: Introductions and Remarks, Larry Geller, President

 

12:00 Program:  City and State Work on Homelessness, Shelter and Housing issues

Panel:

  • Lori Tsuhako, Administrator, Homeless Programs Office, DHS
  • Jun Yang, Executive Director, Office of Housing, City and County of Honolulu
  • Jerry Coffee, Clinical Director, Institute for Human Services
  • Jenny Lee, Staff Attorney, Hawai'i Appleseed Center for Law & Economic Justice

 

12:30 Questions and Answers

 

1:00   Adjourn 

    Wednesday, August 28, 2013

    August 26, 2013 Program: Funding Nonprofits: Who gets funded and why

    The funding of non-profits in Honolulu has recently been the subject of some controversy (see Related, below). For those who are following the issue, here is video from Kokua Council’s August 26 meeting at which we hosted a panel discussion to get responses to audience questions.

    Panelists:

    Ann Kobayashi, City Council Member

    Pam Witty-Oakland, Honolulu C&C Community Services Director

    Lisa Maruyama, Executive Director, HANO (Hawaii Alliance of Nonprofit Organizations

    Moderator and organizer:

    Jim Shon

    (click the little thingy at the lower right for full-screen)

     

    Related:

    1. Honolulu City Council Keeps Controversial Earmarks For Nonprofits ...

      www.civilbeat.com/articles/19217/

      Jun 5, 2013 - If council people don't step up to the plate only these well funded huge non-profits will get all the funding for example who did he award all the ...

    2. Should The City Earmark Millions For Favored Nonprofit Groups ...

      www.civilbeat.com/articles/19189/

      Jun 3, 2013 - "Many of the nonprofit organizations that are now included in the operating budget bill do not even qualify for CDBG funding as was implied.

    3. Where's The Pork? Honolulu City Council Dishes Out The Earmarks ...

      www.civilbeat.com/articles/19041/

      May 14, 2013 - Millions of dollars in taxpayer funds are being funneled to nonprofits and other special interest groups with little public vetting or oversight ..

     

    Note: Video is All Rights Reserved

    Monday, August 12, 2013

    August 26, 2013 Program: Funding Nonprofits: Who gets funded and why


    PLEASE JOIN US FOR LUNCH


    Monday, August 26, 2013

    11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


    Miyama Main Hall, Harris United Methodist Church

    Nuuanu Ave. and South Vineyard Blvd.

    Ample parking - driveway off Nuuanu Ave.

     

    Agenda:

    11:30 Luncheon: Various Subway Sandwiches, Salad, Dessert by Marilyn—$5.00 Donation

     

    11:50 Welcome: Introductions and Remarks, Larry Geller, President

     

    12:00 Program:  “Funding Nonprofits:  Who gets funded and why,” Ann Kobayashi, City Council Member, and Pam Witty-Oakland, Honolulu C&C Community Services Director

     

    12:20 Questions and Answers

     

    1:00   Adjourn 

    Thursday, July 11, 2013

    July 22 Program: Rep. Tom Brower, “Communities Priorities, homelessness, noise and responsible development.”


    PLEASE JOIN US FOR LUNCH


    Monday, July 22,2013

    11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


    Miyama Main Hall, Harris United Methodist Church

    Nuuanu Ave. and South Vineyard Blvd.

    Ample parking - driveway off Nuuanu Ave.

     

    Agenda:

    11:30 Luncheon: Various Subway Sandwiches, Salad, Dessert by Marilyn—$5.00 Donation

     

    11:50 Welcome: Introductions and Remarks, Larry Geller, President

     

    12:00 Program:  Rep. Tom Brower, “Communities Priorities,     homelessness, noise and responsible  development.”

     

    12:20 Questions and Answers

     

    1:00   Adjourn 

    Friday, June 14, 2013

    June 24 Program: Lyn Moku: "WANTED: Eligible Seniors for Home Delivered Meals" (Or what happened to the waiting list?)

     


    PLEASE JOIN US FOR LUNCH


    Monday, June 24,2013

    11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


    Miyama Main Hall, Harris United Methodist Church

    Nuuanu Ave. and South Vineyard Blvd.

    Ample parking - driveway off Nuuanu Ave.

     

    Agenda:

    11:30 Luncheon: Various Pizzas, Salad, Dessert by Marilyn—$5.00 Donation

     

    11:50 Welcome: Introductions and Remarks, Larry Geller, President

     

    12:00 Program: Lyn Moku: "WANTED:  Eligible Seniors for Home Delivered Meals" (Or what happened to the waiting list?)

     

    12:20 Questions and Answers

     

    1:00   Adjourn 

    Thursday, May 16, 2013

    Media push for deficit reduction as revenues peak, deficit dives

    by Larry Geller

    Washington and commercial media still want to cut Social Security and shred the social safety net even though, in the month of April, the federal government reported its highest budget surplus in five years.

    The United States posted its biggest monthly budget surplus in five years in April, the Treasury Department said on Friday, adding that revenues are running at a record high so far this year thanks to higher taxes and an improving economy.

    [Reuters, April budget surplus is biggest in five years, 5/10/2013]

    According to the article, the Treasury reported last month’s surplus as $113 billion, the highest since April 2008. But this surplus is not something new—the surplus in April 2012 was $59 billion.

    In other words, as Republicans and President Obama seek to slash funding for programs affecting the most vulnerable, the deficit is diminishing without those draconian austerity measures. In fact, Reuters reports that the deficit decreased 32% from the corresponding period last year. The same article reports that tax revenues, $1.6 trillion this year, are a record 16 percent higher than last year.

    This is precisely the time when government should be investing in job growth, not “sequestration” and other severe austerity measures that will take wages and money out of the economy. Investing in job growth now should yield even higher revenues in the future and further reduction in deficits.

    Conservatives and the conservative news media haven’t noticed this, however, and have maintained a drumbeat for austerity. “Sequestration,” which was supposed to be so bad that it would never happen, fits their program perfectly. If Obama offers additional cuts, including reductions in social benefit programs that have nothing to do with the deficit in the first place, the combined effect would push towards recession and increased deficits, not deficit reduction.

    But then, when conservative media talk about deficit reduction, what do they really mean? Romney got caught explaining his thinking in a smartphone video, so we should not be surprised to learn that the agenda hasn’t changed, just the words used to further it. The argument de jour is deficit reduction, but the menu hasn’t really changed in a decade at least.

    "While the income of a minority is increasing exponentially, that of the majority is crumbling." - Sen. Bernie Sanders

    Saturday, May 04, 2013

    Video—The Labor Movement In Hawai`i: Then And Now (July 1, 2000)

    by Larry Geller

    Scott Foster of Hawaii Advocates for Consumer Rights has released a video of the late legendary Hawaii labor leader Ah Quon McElrath addressing a meeting of Kokua Council in the year 2000. This is a must-see, especially if you knew AQ. For me, it was like a time machine.

    There’s more information below from Scott’s statement accompanying the release.


    Click on the thingy at the lower right for full screen.

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    Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported  Producer: Scott Foster & Associates

    Link to downloadable video files: http://archive.org/details/McElrathKokuaCouncil


    Scott Foster’s statement:

    LOST VIDEO OF LEGENDARY HAWAI`I LABOR LEADER FOUND

    Hawai`i labor history video by Ah Quon McElrath now archived on line

    After more than a decade, a particularly interesting 50-minute video of the legendary Hawai`i labor leader,  Ah Quon "A.Q" McElrath has been located. Scott Foster, the Communications Director for Hawai`i Advocates For Consumer Rights said, "While looking through the literally hundreds of old VCR tapes of programs I've produced in Hawai`i through the years, I found this priceless tape of A.Q. I had simply forgotten about it. Union member or not, those who had the good fortune to know and be mentored by her will rejoice seeing this video, now digitized and archived on line for all time." 

    The Labor Movement in Hawai`i; Then and Now

    Beginning with the coming of Captain Cook in 1778

    The social and economic impacts of unions in Hawai`i

    This historic program was presented at a special July, 2000, Kokua Council of Seniors luncheon. The Kokua Council is one of the oldest organizations of its kind in Hawai`i -- with a proud history of advocating for significant social-justice issues affecting kupuna, kamali`i and their families. The original event and this video production were sponsored by Scott Foster & Associates and Hawai`i Advocates For Consumer Rights. The original raw video was shot by Jeff Garland of Digitaleye Hawaii.

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      ABOUT A.Q. MCELRATH

    At the time of her death at 92 in December of 2008, much was written about Ah Quon McElrath. The Honolulu Advertiser article, "Labor Champion Dies: She taught us to take risks, take care of others" reads:

    "Ah Quon McElrath, who helped shape the history of labor and social justice in Hawai'i, died Thursday at Kaiser Moanalua Medical Center. She was 92. The diminutive McElrath - known to most as simply "AQ" - helped organize the International Longshore and Warehouse Union in Hawai'i in the 1930s, and dedicated her life to community service, education and improving the welfare of the working class and poor.

    'She was a lifelong champion of the underdog and an eloquent, irrepressible and forceful spokesperson for labor, human rights and progressive causes,' said Bill Puette, director of University of Hawai'i-West O'ahu's Center for Labor Education & Research.

    'She never hesitated to challenge the male-dominated leadership of the unions and force them to look beyond salary issues and to go after standard-of-living improvements like occupational safety, ethnic equality, healthcare and education.'
    ILWU International President Robert McElrath yesterday called her death 'a loss to workers everywhere. AQ was part of the early generation of ILWU leaders who fought hard for working families on the docks, in the fields, in factories and hotels,' he said in a statement.

    ILWU Local 142 President Fred Galdones described McElrath as 'the conscience of the ILWU and our moral compass.'" 

    Monday, April 29, 2013

    Mark your calendar: May 29 Legislative Review: The Good, Bad and Ugly”

     

    The Hawaii Alliance for Retired Americans (HARA) and Kokua Council present their Seventh Legislative Review. Last year’s Review was attended by over 80 people from 30 organizations. We invite you to participate in this year’s Review on May 29. You’ll hear directly from legislators on their assessment of the session. And you’ll be able to question them too.

    RSVP by May 22: Laura Manis, 597-8838 or manis@lava.net

    7th ANNUAL LEGISLATIVE REVIEW “THE GOOD, BAD, AND UGLY”

    An Assessment of the Past Session by Legislative Leaders

    May 29, 2013, 8:30 TO NOON STATE CAPITOL, ROOM 325

    8:30 to 9:00 -- Registration and continental breakfast

    9:00 to 9:10 -- Welcome and Introductions by Presidents Justin Wong, HARA & Larry Geller, Kokua Council

    Recognition of participating organizations

    9:10 to 9:20 -- Greetings from House Speaker: Rep. Joseph Souki and President of Senate, Sen. Donna Mercado Kim

    9:20 to 9:30 Questions and Answers

    9:30 to 9:40 -- Assessment of 2013 session by key legislators

    9:40 to 9:50 Questions and Answers

    9:50 to 10:20 -- Report on Legislative Kupuna Caucus: Chairs, Senators Suzanne Chun Oakland, Rep. Greg Kayatama,

    10:20 to 11:20 -Questions/comments from audience, suggestions for next year.

    11:20 to 11:30 – Presentation of the Shining Light Awards

    11:30 to 12:00 -- Light lunch and networking/socializing

    CO-SPONSORED and HOSTED BY HARA AND KOKUA COUNCIL

    Friday, April 19, 2013

    Project Dana announces Eden at Home training sessions

    Project Dana has announced two Eden at Home Training sessions in Pearl City and Kailua.

    The trainings in Kailua are on May 2 and May 9. A flyer with registration information is here.

    The trainings in Pearl City are on June 1 and June 8. A flyer with registration information is here.

    This information was received from Project Dana:

    The Eden at Home training is based on the thought-provoking philosophy of The Eden Alternative® inspired by Dr. William Thomas.  The Eden Alternative® is a proven and powerful model for improving the quality of life of both Elders and their care partners since the early nineties. Its philosophy is comprised of ten foundational principles that have transformed hundreds of long-term care residences in the U.S. and beyond (Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Canada, etc.).  The trainings also provide an opportunity for each of us to envision our future and how it is that we would like to participate in our own care when that time comes.

    A nominal $10 fee will be assessed for workshop manuals.

    Thursday, April 04, 2013

    April 22 Program: Hospice is about living fully


    PLEASE JOIN US FOR LUNCH


    Monday, April 22,2013

    11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


    Miyama Main Hall, Harris United Methodist Church

    Nuuanu Ave. and South Vineyard Blvd.

    Ample parking - driveway off Nuuanu Ave.

     

    Agenda:

    11:30 Luncheon: Various Subway Sandwiches, Salad, and Dessert$5.00 Donation

     

    11:50 Welcome: Introductions and Remarks, Larry Geller, President

     

    12:00 Program: Gary Simon, St. Francis Hospice. Hospice is about living fully. Who pays for it? What are the services? How does it help the family?

     

    12:20 Questions and Answers

     

    1:00   Adjourn 

    Friday, March 15, 2013

    March 25 program: Designing or Modifying Your Home for Safely and Comfortably Aging in Place


    PLEASE JOIN US FOR LUNCH


    Monday, March 25,2013

    11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


    Miyama Main Hall, Harris United Methodist Church

    Nuuanu Ave. and South Vineyard Blvd.

    Ample parking - driveway off Nuuanu Ave.

     

    Agenda:

    11:30 Luncheon: Various Subway Sandwiches, Salad, and Dessert$5.00 Donation

     

    11:50 Welcome: Introductions and Remarks, Larry Geller, President

     

    12:00 Program: "Designing or Modifying Your Home for Safely and Comfortably Aging in Place," Carol Kozlovich. Carol is an award-winning interior designer in private practice for 35 years.  People, of any age, who plan to remodel, can create a home that is functional, beautiful, comfortable and safe - and increase its value at the same time.

     

    12:20 Questions and Answers

     

    1:00   Adjourn 

    Sunday, February 03, 2013

    Communities for a Lifetime–Wednesday Feb. 6, 2013

     

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    The Interfaith Open Table presents

    Wednesday, February 6, 2013

    7:00-8:30 a.m.

    Harris United Methodist Church

    20 South Vineyard Boulevard, Honolulu

    7:00 a.m.

    Introductions and Announcements

    Rev. Irene Matsumoto

    7:10 a.m.

    Communities for a Lifetime

    Pamela Chow, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa

    Communities For a Lifetime project is being developed to assist communities in Hawai'i to improve resources and increase capacity for its residents throughout their lives. The goal is to assess the assets and resident perceptions of current and future resources required to improve the liability or 'age friendliness' of communities. The theoretical framework focuses on three environmental categories based on the World Health Organization's eight topical features of age-friendly places: physical (housing, outdoor spaces and buildings, transportation), social (social participation, respect and social inclusion, civic engagement and employment), and service (community support and health services, communications and information), which support or hinder independent lifestyle choices and participation of individuals in their communities as they age.

    To reduce the financial burden to individuals, families, and communities it is important that independent living is encouraged and available with increased options to allow our population to age in place successfully and create a livable community for all.

    8:30 a.m. Adjourn and Networking